What Is the Scottish Shower

What Is the Scottish Shower?

You’ve may have heard of or seen a Scottish shower offered in spas. However, if you’re wondering what is the Scottish Shower exactly and what the reasons to have one – I can explain.

A Scottish shower is very similar to a contrast shower. It involves taking a shower and alternating between hot and cold water while you’re showering.

So before you go ahead and book one, be prepared to stand or lay under blasts of hot and cold water.

It’s not as uncomfortable as it sounds though. I’ve been having contrast showers every morning for about a year now and don’t find it uncomfortable at all.

Plus, the health benefits, as I will explain, and more than worth a few minutes of shock factor in my opinion.

A Little History of Scottish Showers

Anyone who is familiar with Scotland will be able to tie together the connection between cold water and showers.

It’s true that it rains a lot in Scotland and the winter months are really cold. I’m not sure exactly when and how this type of shower took the name, but as far as I can find out that’s why.

Although the benefits of cold showers, contrast showers, and hopping from saunas to ice lakes were realized all across Europe more than one hundred years ago.

How to Have a Scottish Shower

You don’t need to book a session at a spa for a Scottish shower. It would be a pampering experience, but you can have a Scottish shower in your shower at home just the same.

It’s best with a power shower and a shower that changes from hot to cold water quickly. But see how you get on with whatever shower you have.

Here is what you need to do:

  • Start with a warm shower. You don’t need to go too hot that it’s uncomfortable, around 40 degrees will do.
  • After around 4 minutes turn the water to cold.
  • Shower in cold water for half the time of hot, so 2 minutes. (You can change the duration if you want.)
  • Alternate between hot and cold water 2-3 times.

A couple of things to remember here is that it’s not an endurance test. Don’t make the water too hot and cold that’s it’s uncomfortable.

When first starting Scottish showers you might want to start off with temperatures that are less shocking and work up to a wider contrast.

While the effects of Scottish showers are to feel energized and refreshed if you do not feel like this after the first few don’t give up.

This is because your body starts to flush more toxins and this can take a toll on your energy levels.

But once you’re blood is pumping regularly and you’ve flushed a load of toxins that were putting a strain on your immune system you’re going to feel great, trust me!

Health Benefits of a Scottish Shower

I’ve covered the health benefits of contrast showers in detail in another post. It’s very much the same for a Scottish shower, the contrast of hot and cold water offers the following wellness benefits:

  • Boosts levels of natural energy
  • Strengthens the immune system
  • Aids relief from depression
  • Boosts feel-good hormones
  • Boosts testosterone levels in men
  • Increases blood circulation
  • Improves look and feel of hair and skin

It’s a great way to start the day, there is no denying this. Whenever I speak to someone about Scottish or contrast showers I simply tell them to try it for a week.

After a week you’ll find it easy, notice you feeler more energized and alive first thing in the morning, and I’m confident you will not switch back to regular showers.

So, why not give it a try?

Scottish Shower or Cold Shower

There are a lot of similar health benefits to cold and Scottish showers. So much so that it comes down to personal preference which you take.

Alternating between hot and cold water actually stimulates the body to produce more hormones, blood circulation, and has more of an effect than just a straight cold shower.

Once you’re braving a Scottish shower why not try a cold shower too and see for yourself how they feel.

The proof is always in the results, and you can only really know how you’ll feel by trying something.

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